Tag Archive | Historical

In conversation with Georgia Hill

At this time of year it is only natural to remember the year that has just ended and look forward to the months ahead. We find ourselves making plans and resolutions that may, ultimately, change our lives forever.

Georgia Hill

Georgia Hill

Author of contemporary romance, Georgia Hill, made such a change in 2015 by stepping outside her normal genre and publishing her first historical romance. I’m, therefore, delighted to welcome Georgia to my blog to find out how and why she made the change.

Georgia used to live in London, where she worked in the theatre. Later, she got the bizarre job of teaching road safety to the U.S. navy – in Marble Arch! She now lives in a tiny Herefordshire village, where, she tells me, she scandalises the neighbours by not keeping ‘country hours’ and being unable to make a decent pot of plum jam. Her home is a converted oast house, which she shares with her two beloved spaniels, husband and a ghost called Zoe.

Thank you for taking the time to talk to me today, Georgia, and not bringing Zoe with you!

I’m delighted to be with you, thank you so much for having me on! Happy New Year!

Happy New Year to you too! The start of a new year is a time for making resolutions, plans or setting goals. Can you share with us your resolutions and plans for 2016?

 I didn’t make any resolutions for 2015 so am determined to make some for the forthcoming year. We’re hoping to move house, so relocating is the main goal for 2016. However, we still haven’t decided where we want to go! I need to finish the WIP (work in progress) and return to a book I’ve  abandoned. I’d also like to begin the search for an agent and I’m going to self-publish three books for which I’ve just received the rights back. There’s a visit to the Harper Collins headquarters arranged for February and I’m going to be brave and try getting my books into local shops. So, the first few months of 2016 are already mapped out.

It sounds like the coming year is going to be very busy with serious lifestyle and career changes. Just for fun, if you were able to do/achieve anything you like in 2016, no matter how outrageous, what would it be and why?

This question has me stumped! I can think of lots of things I’d like to learn – Italian, how to ballroom dance and I’d love to learn to sing. I really ought to learn how to use my new laptop as I keep putting that off but something outrageous? What I’d really love to do is be able to tell people exactly what I think – just for a day – with no repercussions. That would be fun! Or be able to talk dog language so I know what’s going on in the heads of my two spaniels. I’m pretty sure I know anyway – walkies, food, tummy rubs just about covers their needs. Mine too, come to think about it!

I think my dog, Alfie, would probably say the same things! You have been a successful author of contemporary romance for many years, but in 2015 you had your first historical romance, While I Was Waiting , published. Why did you decide to change subgenres and was it an easy or hard WIWW final coverdecision to make?

That’s very kind of you! I’ve always written and have been writing seriously for the last ten years but have only been published since 2009, so I still think of myself as a beginner! I wrote novellas while I was working as a teacher as they fitted into the time I had available. I love historical fiction, especially dual narrative – my all-time favourite book is Lady of Hay by Barbara Erskine. I wanted to see if I could write in that genre. Although I enjoy writing and reading rom-coms, I knew I had something else to offer. While I Was Waiting evolved over a long time and I poured my heart and soul into it. It’s the book I’m proudest of. I have many other ideas for books in a similar genre, but another novella in the Sequins series is planned too. Writing is like reading; you work on different things at different times. Sometimes you’re in the mood for something short and sassy, sometimes you want a slow-burner or something more serious. I find each genre has its challenges. Nothing is easy to write!

Were there any surprises or difficulties about changing subgenre?

I think I relaxed more! I think historical, dual narrative is more me. I also had to plan more efficiently and develop a more organised way to work. I learned lots during the process of writing While I Was Waiting. Hopefully, that will feed into any future writing.

Were you nervous about how While I Was Waiting would be received by readers who enjoy your contemporary romances?

Very! I considered using another name, or a variation of my author name. However, my editor raised no concerns so While I Was Waiting is published under Georgia Hill. Thankfully, it seems my readers have accepted the change in direction. Thinking about it though, my novellas dealt with serious issues such as bullying, body image, agoraphobia and While I Was Waiting has a lot of humour in it. Maybe they’re not so different after all?

Your first historical romance has received great reviews. Do you have plans to write more or try another sub-genre?

Thank you! As it’s the book of my heart, I’m thrilled and humbled readers love it. The next book is in the same genre; it’s a dual narrative supernatural set on the Jurassic Coast. The one after that has numerous narrative strands, but with a strong supernatural element. The three books should stand together well, although they’re only linked by genre. As for other genres, never say never. I’d love to have a go at children’s fiction or an adult fairy tale.

When a new year starts, many of us think about making changes or trying new things over the coming months, but do not have the courage to do it. From your experience, what advice can you offer others about trying something different to what is expected of you?

I’m possibly the worst person to ask this – I don’t always respond to change easily. I suppose I’d say, have a go. You never know what you can achieve unless you try. And what have you got to lose?

Can you share with us what you are working on at the moment?

I’d love to! It’s the story of recently bereaved Charlie, who travels to Lyme Regis in Dorset to investigate a family scandal. She meets Matt and together they discover her family’s secret and why Charlie is being haunted by the ghost of a Victorian fossil collector – who means her and those she loves great harm.

It sounds intriguing. Thank you for your candid interview, Georgia. Your experience has certainly inspired me to explore other genres, both as a writer and as a reader, and I wish you all the best for your next book.

Thank you for having me on Brenda, I’ve loved talking to you. I hope 2016 brings you all you wish for!

You can visit Georgia’s blog and website page here and her Facebook page here . You can also follow her on twitter @georgiawrites .

Click on While I Was Waiting to buy the book.

In conversation with romance author Jo Beverley

Today I am delighted to welcome romance author, Jo Beverley, to my blog.

Jo Beverley

Jo Beverley

Jo is the NYT bestselling author of over thirty-nine historical romance novels, all set in her native England. Her novels have won the RITA, romance’s top award, five times and she is a member of Romance Writers of America’s Hall of Fame.

Publisher’s Weekly declared Jo Beverley as “Arguably today’s most skilful writer of intelligent historical romance…” Her work has been described as “Sublime!” by Booklist and Romantic Times described her as “one of the great names of the genre.”

Welcome to my blog, Jo and thank you for taking time out of your busy day to chat. Just for fun, which five words do you think best describes you?

Five?  I can come up with laid-back and creative, but I’m really not self-analytical.

What inspired you to write your very first book?

Photo by Kromkrathog FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

Vocation, perhaps? I always had stories in my head and started to write them as a child. I fiddled around, with my efforts becoming longer, until we emigrated to Canada and I had time on my hands, and then one poured out. I do feel that I have always been a writer, just as I have not been an athlete, a musician, or an inventor. I’m fortunate to have found the way to be what I’m meant to be.

 

 

What are the challenges (research, literary, psychological or logistical) in bringing a book to life?

I suppose, being true to it. I don’t pre-plan my books, so sometimes I find myself hurtling along and have to stop because though it’s fun it’s not true. Then I have to toss the rubbish out and dig deeper for what’s really going on.  In addition my books always hit a spot about half to two-thirds through when I’m sure that this time it’s not going to work. My husband calls it “the time of the book.” The only thing to do is carry on.

I don’t get writer’s block, though I sometimes find the energy weakens on a book. In that case I start something new, or return to an old project, sometimes just for fun, and return to the other one later. I do believe in preserving the fun in fiction, in all senses.

What books/authors have influenced your writing or writing style and why?

Photo by usamedeniz FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Photo by usamedeniz
FreeDigitalPhotos.net

That’s a tricky one because I’d have to say all of them. I’m sure everything we read has some effect. I’ve never been a great one for how-to-write books, though some have been helpful along the way. Telling Lies for Fun and Profit by Lawrence Block was helpful. I read it early in my writing life and it liberated me to do just that. I didn’t have to “write what you know” or be literary-serious about this. I could invent people and places for the sheer joy of it and hope others would enjoy reading my stories.

By the way, the SF writer Orson Scott Card clarified the “write what you know” for me when he pointed out that he knows more about the books he’s read, the films he’s watched and the stories other people have told him than what he was doing as a teenager.

While you are writing, do you ever feel as if you are one of the characters?

No, but I’m often inhabiting them, if that makes sense. Mostly I see what’s going on as a video but I also get inside their heads and share their emotions in order to share all that with the readers. There have to be bits of me in my characters, but I’ve never been interested in writing disguised autobiography.

Tell us a little about your latest book and why you chose that story-line/setting?

I assume you mean the MIP? (Masterpiece/mess/monster in progress.) It’s a marriage of convenience story, which is a favourite of mine. I also write linked books and this one, The Viscount Needs a Wife , rolls out from last April’s Too Dangerous for a Lady . In that one the hero has a friend  who’s a town dandy.

Braydon was in the army, but we’re past Waterloo and he’s sold out and is enjoying his money and his leisure. Being a bit bored after a year of gadding about he’s happy to become involved in Lord Faringay’s anti-terrorism activities. (Yes, that does make sense in the Regency.) So he has the life he wants — London-based, but with challenging government work. Then he unexpectedly inherits a title and, worse, a country estate. When he arrives at Beauchamp Abbey he also finds the previous viscount’s mother and daughter, both intent on making his life worse.

So, as the title says, The Viscount Needs a Wife, in particular one who’ll look after the estate and deal with the troublesome women so he can return to London. A friend suggests a widow, Mrs. Kitty Cateril, who turns out to be sensible and forthright, and so he settles on her. The novel follows their relationship as they learn about one another and make necessary adjustments, but there’s an external plot about an attempt to kill some of the royal dukes — the king’s sons.

The story opens just before Princess Charlotte died in childbirth in November, 1817. Despite George III having seventeen children, she was the only legitimate grandchild, so the royal succession was in peril. Braydon’s called upon to find the culprits and keep the royal family safe.

It sounds really interesting. You have written many books during your illustrious career and experienced many book launches. Do you still get excited or nervous when your latest book is launched?

I’m not sure books launch these days so much as flow out when the sluice gate is raised. With the promo build up and many readers pre-ordering copies online to be delivered on the day, the actual day doesn’t mean much. The reviews are in, as are the orders from the major booksellers. My editor, agent and I all watch the bestseller lists, but part of our attention is on the future.

I find that time is odd in a writer’s life. When Too Dangerous for a Lady was released my mind was deep into The Viscount Needs a Wife, and we were already discussing the back copy and cover.  Too Dangerous for a Lady was important, but not at the top of my mind. In addition, these days all my backlist is available in e-book, and mostly in print, so I have  thirty-nine “live” books, plus a number of novellas. If I get an e-mail from a reader it’s as likely to be about one of my backlist as about the latest one.

 

Are there any words of wisdom you would give to your younger self at the start of your writing career?

Well, about ten years ago I should have claimed back some rights to books that weren’t truly in print, because I could probably do better now publishing them myself. Now the publishers have realized their value and are less likely to release them.

At the beginning? Perhaps I should have tried harder to get my first book published back in the late seventies. On the other hand, I don’t think I was a good enough writer, and I’m not sure I was ready then in other ways.  By 1988 there was much more support and education for romance writers and I learned. Also, word processors and computers were becoming available. I don’t think I could have written many books on a typewriter. Not long after I sold my first book, the internet became more available and I had access to writers around the world. So I think I did all right in the end.

Jo Beverley

Jo Beverley

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I write for your entertainment and pleasure. If ever I dissatisfy, it’s not for want of trying. But I also have to be true to myself, my characters and my stories, so it is what it is. And thank you.

Thank you for a candid and informative interview, Jo. I’ve really enjoyed it.

For more information on Jo’s books, please visit Jo Beverley’s website by clicking on this link .

 

Tears are valuable, do not waste them.

Photo by Xedos4

I have come to the conclusion that being a writer is similar to being on a roller coaster. There are highs and lows, twists and turns, and terrifying moments when you have to muster up some courage from the darkest recess of your psyche…. or wherever courage tends to lurk. At times I wonder why I even climbed on board, considering that in reality I am not very brave when it comes to roller coasters.

The highs are many, ranging from that “eureka moment” when you have an idea for a novel, to the feeling of satisfaction when the words on the page vividly portrays what has been playing out in your mind. There are also thrilling moments – like seeing your book in print for the first time or being nominated for an award. It is at times like this I feel like screaming “faster” and start planning my next ride.

Needless to say, the lows can be painful, crushing and a reality check. I experienced one only the other day when my laptop took a document and book trailer I had been working on within its technical claws and refuse to give it back.

FreeDigital Photos.net Photo by Jesadaphorn

Photo by Jesadaphorn

When a technically minded knight in shining armour managed to get the laptop working again, my document and book trailer had disappeared into the ether – leaving my knight somewhat perplexed. Even a magic aide called a “recovery thingummy-jig” did not help. I normally save things elsewhere to avoid such a catastrophe, but this time I did not and now they are gone – forever. Lesson well and truly learnt.

So I moped, grumbled and felt very sorry for myself, but it got me nowhere as moping, grumbling and feeling sorry for oneself tends to do. I realised that if I wanted to lessen my misery, the only thing I could do was do something about it. After-all, in the grand scheme of things when the world is in such turmoil and real life tragedies are being experienced every second of every day, my loss is so very minor. Determined (and too stubborn to allow a computer to have the upper hand) I started all over again, trying to remember what I had written before my memory began to fail me and I ran out of chocolate.

There are far more worthy things to shed a tear over than the many things we allow to make us miserable. The lows in life are many, so it only seems sensible to be discerning on which “lows” we allow to affect us. An annoying, temperamental laptop, with a diva complex, is not going to be one of them and my tears deserve a more worthy cause.

Photo by Iosphere

Photo by Iosphere

 

All photos are from FreeDigitalPhotos.net

In conversation with romance author Jane Jackson

Jane Jackson

Jane Jackson

Before my first book was published, romance author, Jane Jackson, was incredibly generous with her time by answering some questions I had about the publishing industry. A professional writer for thirty years, three times shortlisted for major Awards, today is the launch date for Jane’s  29th published novel, The Consul’s Daughter. Married with a growing family, she has lived in Cornwall all her life where wonderful scenery, fascinating history and pioneering inventors provide inspiration for both her historical adventure romances and her new Polvellan Cornish Mystery series. I am, understandably, delighted such an experienced and successful author has agreed to be my first guest.

Thank you for taking the time to talk to me today, Jane, as I understand 2015 has been a busy year for you so far. Are you able to tell us a little about what you have been up to?

The-Consuls-Daughter-192x300I’ve been working on a sequel to The Consul’s Daughter but took a break to write the third of my Polvellan Cornish Mysteries, The Loner, which I hope to finish by the end of July. Then it’s back to complete The Master’s Wife.  After that I’ll begin research for a trilogy of historical thrillers. I also have outlines drafted for four more Polvellan Mysteries. Because these are present-day and at 25,000 words much shorter, writing them makes a lovely change even though they need just as much research!

You have enjoyed a very successful career as a writer, was there a particular moment, incident or book that inspired you to write your first novel?

There was. It came about through a combination of circumstances.  I was a single parent with two small children and an ulcer which meant my life revolved around playschool and domestic life. I’d loved reading since I was four, so I decided to have a go at writing something. I finished a Correspondence Course in Writing that my mother had abandoned. I enjoyed the challenge and learning something new, but realised that journalism and writing for TVPhotoFunia-1435845382 weren’t for me.  Then I had a nightmare. In my dream I ‘saw’ a bar in an old Cornish pub, and a group of fishermen who were members of the village male voice choir.  One of the men started laughing. At first everyone was amused. But he didn’t – couldn’t – stop and he laughed himself to death.  It was still vivid in my mind next morning. I wondered if such a thing could actually happen (it could, and had) and discovered the joys of research. Deadly Feast took three years to research and write. It was accepted by Robert Hale and I knew what I wanted to do with the rest of my life.

How long does it take to write a book now and do you have any writing quirks or habits that help with the writing process?

The length of time varies depending on the length of book. I always get drawn along unexpected paths of research and end up doing far more than I need. But of what I learn, 90% remains under the surface supporting the 10% that appears in the story.  My longer novels take between 8-10 months to write. One quirk I have is to begin researching the next when I’m ¾ of the way through the current one.  This means that though I still suffer end-of-book-blues, they can’t last long as the next one is demanding to be written. My Polvellan stories take 2-3 months each.  Another habit is to do a rolling edit – re-reading the previous day’s work as soon as I sit down. This gets me tuned into the story and raring to move it along.  When the book is finished it gets another careful read-through so it’s as good as I can get it before it goes to my editor for his input.

As an experienced author, is there anything you have learnt during your writing career that has surprised you?

The way the characters in my books become absolutely real to me. They are a product of my imagination, yet it’s as if they actually exist in another dimension and I’ve found a way from my world into theirs allowing me to live the events and emotions.  Though I plan my stories in detail, the characters make choices and take actions I hadn’t foreseen. These have consequences which add further layers to the story.

I can certainly relate to that. If you had to choose a career that had nothing to do with writing, what would it be and why? 

When I was at school I wanted to work in a pathology lab. What appealed to me were the research and discovery aspects of the work. But I failed maths – twice.  So though my potential medical career fell at the first hurdle, my love of research was already in place, waiting to be developed.

So now you use your love of research in your writing career. If your “significant other” had to choose a career for you, what would they choose and why?

I’ve just asked him and his answer made me laugh because he said ‘a pathology lab.’  (I was a fan of the original CSI series, and I also enjoy NCIS and Kathy Reichs’ books.)  ‘Or maybe a Records office or archive. Definitely a job where you’d be involved in research.’   He knows me well!

The-Consuls-Daughter-192x300I understand your 29th book is coming out today called The Consul’s Daughter, would you mind telling us a little bit about it?

I’d be delighted! Caseley is the 21-year-old daughter of Teuder Bonython, successful shipyard owner and consul for Mexico. When he falls ill, and her brother refuses to be involved, Caseley takes responsibility for the shipyard, the consulate, and her father’s health. Not conventionally beautiful, Caseley also resigns herself to a life without love … until she encounters Jago Barata, half-Spanish captain of a Bonython ship. Jago is fearless, determined, a brilliant sailor – he’s also impudent, arrogant, and unnaturally perceptive. Love is the last thing on Caseley’s mind as their every encounter sets her and Jago at each other’s throats.

But just when she thinks Jago is out of her life for good, Caseley must deliver a letter to Spain on behalf of her father – a letter containing information that could seal the fate of Spain one way or another. It will be a journey filled with doubt, intrigue and danger – and the only ship leaving in time is Jago’s…

It sounds really exciting, what inspired the plot/setting for this latest novel?

Cornwall

Cornwall

In a biography of Cornish engineer Richard Trevithick I read that he spent time in Mexico, installing huge pumping engines at silver mines.  I thought that sounded interesting.  Then I read that when silver is extracted from copper, lead or zinc ores, the process requires mercury – which was shipped out to Mexico from Spain.  But in 1874, the middle of the Victorian era and a favourite period of mine, Spain was gripped by civil war and ships were trapped by a blockade in the port of Bilbao.  My historical romances always have a connection to Cornwall. So once I know the background and period (usually inter-dependent) I think ‘what if?’  What if the owner of a ship repair yard also owns and charters ships?  What if one of his captains is half-Spanish? What if, being a respected businessman from a long-established family, the yard owner is also a consul?  What if he is sent documents from Mexico vital to Spain’s future but he’s too ill to take them himself? What if he has a daughter? What if, a crippled foot caused by the accident that killed her mother has left her with a limp? Unable to dance – an important social skill in young women – she was taught Spanish by a sympathetic teacher?   For me, plot grows out of character, and character choices influence development of the plot.

Do you think the names of the main characters in a book are important and why did you choose the names in this latest novel?

Yes, I do think names are important.  They need to be right for the period of the story and for the location.  They also need to ‘fit’ the characters so you can’t imagine them being called anything else.  I chose Caseley, which is actually a Cornish surname, partly because it was different but authentic and I liked the sound of it, partly because at that time children were often named for grandparents, godparents or to flatter someone from whom the family might have ‘expectations.’  Bonython is an old Cornish surname. Caseley Bonython works well.  The same applied to giving her father the first name ‘Teuder.’  You have to admit ‘Teuder Bonython’ does have a certain ring to it! My hero is half-Cornish half-Spanish. Jago is Cornish for James.  His surname, Barata, is Spanish from his father. But he also has a middle name from his Cornish mother’s family, Lansallos.

 Where and when can readers purchase  The Consul’s Daughter?

Ebook edition available 2nd July  price £2.99

Paperback edition available 30th July price £12.99

Click here to view and buy the book

Finally, is there anything specific you would like to say to your readers?

Thank you, BD, for inviting me onto your blog.  If anyone has further questions I’d love to hear from you.

You can reach me via my blog or my Facebook Page .

Thank you, Jane, I’ve really enjoyed our chat today and I wish you all the best for The Consul’s Daughter.

Value our YOUth of today…

Photo Stuart Miles FreeDigitalPhotos.net

I, like many people, dislike having my photograph taken. It’s not that I have a phobia of the little digital box pointing at my face; it’s the result that I dread. The image staring back at me is often a disappointment, every flaw is magnified in high definition and even a few more that I did not think I had!

Jayne Gordon (right) Portrait of a Writer

When photographer, Jayne Gordon, required a number of authors to take part in her project Portrait of a Writer, I gladly volunteered in the hope I would pick up a few tips along the way. Jayne’s exhibition, which was held in May, was a great success. When I accepted an invitation to view the results, I also had a chance to meet up with some fellow authors who were also involved in the project. If only all my experiences of photography were as pleasant or fun.

When I look back at the photos of my younger self, I am not so critical. Yes, some of my fashion choices were rather cringe worthy, but I like to think that the 70s and 80s were ground breaking eras where fashion rules were broken and, in some cases, pulverised into a glittering mess. I have a sneaking suspicion that when I am in my twilight years (stop laughing, I am not quite there yet) I will look back on my photos of today and be less critical.

It reminds me of Mary Schmich’s “Advice, like youth, probably just wasted on the young” which was published in the Chicago Tribune on June 1, 1997. Her words were later put to music by Baz Luhrmann in the song “Everybody’s Free To Wear Sunscreen”.  Schmich’s words of wisdom cover many topics and I strongly believe that everyone should listen to it at least once in their life. One astute piece of advice is about appreciating the power and beauty of our youth.

Photo Ambro FreeDigitalPhotos.net

However, I would like to think that “youth” is not just confined to the first two decades of our life. We are still considered young when we are compared to someone who is ten or twenty years older than ourselves. After all, a  fifty year old is young compared to someone who is seventy and a seventy year old is considered young by a ninety year old.  So whatever our age, we should value our “youth of today” as in a few years time we will look back on the photos of ourselves as we are today and finally see how truly fabulous we really are.

I will try and remember this next time I look in the lens of my digital tormentor or study my flaws in high definition. If I do not like the photo, I will try and see it with the eyes and wisdom of my older self and, perhaps, I will not consider it so bad after all.

Today’s book is the sum of the past.

I saw the flicker of scepticism in my friend’s face before she had a chance to mask it. Unfortunately, the look did not surprise me, as it was a reaction I have become familiar with in others.

“Really?” she asked.
“Yes. Why do I feel that you don’t believe me?” I challenged.
The scepticism changed to nervous, embarrassed laughter.
“Well…,” she said eventually, “…you just don’t look the type.”

You would think that I had just confessed to robbing a bank vault or expressed a wish to be a nun, but the reality was not so dramatic. Yet, my confession that I liked to read historical romances had, I could tell, subtlety changed my friend’s view of me and, in that moment, I felt it was not towards the positive.

So has the historical romance genre become uncool to read? I certainly hope not! However I can’t help wondering why a business woman, who is independently minded and (I hope) fairly intelligent, not be considered the “type” to enjoy historical romance. Perhaps its chequered history can be partly to blame…

In the past, historical romances were chaste and even sometimes lacked the now obligatory ‘happy ever after’. If lust and passion reared their obscene heads in England, as with Lady Chatterley’s Lover, publishers risked being brought to trial under the Obscene Publications Act 1959.

However, the titanic plates of the romance genre shifted by the 1970s and the historical romance genre were all about domination. Today we may find these hard to tolerate and even label them abusive. However, these novels were ground breaking for the time as, for the first time, novels showed passion and lust that was previously, for decency sake, not referred to. Readers lapped up these stories in the privacy of their own homes. Yes, the 70’s was the hippy era and free love for all, or so we are to believe, but for many women the reality of their lives was much more mundane. Reading about a passion filled, dominate hero gave the reader the escapism that they longed for. These readers were, strangely, being rebellious in their own way, although readers of today may be horrified to hear this view.
By the 1990’s women wanted to read about sassy heroines, who were independent and no longer victims. Although historical romances remained, trying to remain true to the historical period would place the inevitable constraints that contemporary romances did not have to limit themselves to.
By the 2000’s a whole sub-genre of romances grew in popularity, including humorous, suspenseful, inspirational, erotic, science fiction, paranormal, vampire and werewolf romances.

Perhaps this explosion has left the traditional historical romance appearing, to some, a little out of date or stuck in a rut.
Perhaps the historical romance genre of the past has given my friend a slanted view of the typical historical romance readers of today. Does she believe lovers of historical romance are still like the wide-eyed 1970s reader, who, strangely in her opinion, enjoyed reading about dominant heroes and must, therefore, be lacking in some part of their life.

The reality is that the well written romance of today are about women finding their own identity and their journey getting there, whilst finding Mr Right along the way. It can have the historical detail of the classics, the passion and lust of the 70’s and an independent heroine of today that is a survivor of the constraints placed upon her. Historical romances can be fluff and fun, after all who needs serious reading all the time, but equally it can be an informative, passionate roller-coaster that can rival any thriller, autobiography or mystery. It’s the author and their skill that matters, not the genre it is placed in.

PhotoFunia-1431540322